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Adoption in South Carolina

Adopting a child into a home can be an exciting time for a family. Often times, paperwork and legal confusions slow down the process and interfere with bringing new life into the home. It is important to understand the adoption process so you can set realistic expectations for you and your loved one.

Who Can Adopt?

In South Carolina, Title 63, Chapter 9, which is also known as South Carolina Children’s Code, states that any resident may petition the court to adopt a child and that the placement of a child is contingent upon extensive review of the adoptees. There are exceptions that require additional review, which should be considered and can be reviewed with a family lawyer in South Carolina.

Is written consent required for adoption?

 In most circumstances, written consent from the natural parents of a child or a legal guardian is required for adoption. However, in some circumstances written consent from a parent of guardian is not required when a parent whose parental rights have been terminated, a parent who is found to be mentally incapable of consent, and when a parent has given the child over to an adoption agency. Consent is required to be given fully without coercion and may be revoked if proven.

Will the child meet their parents?

 It is important to know that an adoption agency keeps the names of the biological parents confidential, unless otherwise instructed by the parent giving over their child. A biological parent can allow their child to receive their name and information after the child has turned twenty-one. The consent of both the adopted child and the biological parent or guardian is required in order to receive this information.

Adopting a child should not involve any unexpected fees. Under no circumstance will an agency or any person receive compensation in exchange for giving up a child for adoption. It is a felony in the state of South Carolina to participate in the selling or buying of a child. Fees that are involved in adoption may include medical and living expenses, investigative reports, guardian ad litem, attorney fees, and fees to a child-placing agency. A person or agency that is licensed by the State Department of Social Services has the authority to place a child; however, a person who facilitates an adoption is not required to have a license.

Solomon Law Group is mindful of the stress and anxiety that often accompanies adoption and is here to answer your questions. We offer a free consultation for parents who are looking to adopt. We can review your case alongside you and help to outline your adoption options. After hiring us as your lawyers, we will help you finalize your adoption in a way that is efficient and as low-cost as possible. To learn more about your adoption options you can contact Solomon Law Group by phone at 877-323-3120.

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